DesignTaxi: Designer Imagines Tokyo Without Its Iconic Advertisements And Billboards

Visual clutter versus visual enhancement?
Visually pleasing or visually disturbing?

This could apply to an overall cityscape, a flower arrangement, even a person. As long as it is done well, then the debate that is really in the eyes of the beholder and a matter of creating and keeping the standards. The right to police ourselves, a mutual respect for the environment and for others is the highest form of an evolved society and not be subjected to regulations, punishment and a cycle which is exhausting for both the industry players and the industry regulators.

So, before that rant above - the question I had -
Visual clutter versus visual enhancement?
Visually pleasing or visually disturbing?

 I recently discovered an exciting new resource at Design Taxi and I have inserted the link at the side panel which directs to the billboard related ones only. One of them which strikes me well - "Designer Imagines Tokyo Without Its Iconic Advertisements And Billboards"


The article from DesignTaxi as such - Full link to the article here 

One of the more prominent features of the bustling city of Tokyo is its advertisements which saturate the city's architecture. The many billboards that feature promotions, events or shops are a familiar sight to residents and visitors. French graphic designer, Nicolas Damiens imagines how Tokyo would be like without the ads in his personal project, Tokyo No Ads.
How did we recognize Tokyo from a single glance?
How did the iconic billboards make it more alive?

Other articles on Tokyo and its advertisements/ LED art etc are here:
2009 Aug 23 - Life-sized Google Map Markers In Tokyo! 
2012 Dec 11 - Tokyo Highlights - Advertising Museum and LED Art Gallery 
2012 Dec 12 - Tokyo Highlights - OOH Advertising

Comments

Geet Choudhary said…
Nice post...Myhoardings provide advertisers, the facility to promote their brand by Digital OOH Advertising in City/Radio taxis-A direct way to pop-up your message to customers while they are travelling on roads in Indian cities.